Transcript of the November #ukmedlibs chat

The transcript of the November #ukmedlibs chat, on engaging clinical and executive champions for NHS library and knowledge services, is now available. Thanks, everyone who participated, and to Louise Goswami, @goswamilouise,  National Programme Manager for Library and Knowledge Services, Health Education England, who led the discussion.

 

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November chat: clinical and executive champions for NHS library and knowledge services Tuesday 17 November

Our November chat will be something new, a Twitter focus group. Louise Goswami, National Programme Manager for Library and Knowledge Services, Health Education England, is undertaking research into how to identify, influence and support clinical and executive champions to become effective advocates for library and knowledge services as well as determining how the impact of these champions could be measured.

To that end, she’s conducting a series of interviews and focus groups, and one of these will take place on Twitter as our November Twitter chat. The chat will take place at 8 p.m. on Tuesday 17 November. Read Louise’s introduction to and context for the research [MSWord]. This document also contains a consent form; please complete and return to Louise at the e-mail address given.

Please remember to use the #ukmedlibs hashtag. Numbered questions are below. If you haven’t participated in a Twitter chat before, our friends at #uklibchat have written a useful guide.

  1. Who do we need to influence and persuade of the value of library and knowledge services?
  2. What would you consider to be the attributes of an effective champion?
  3. What would you consider to be the role of a clinical or executive champion?
  4. How can potential champions be identified and influenced to undertake the role?
  5. What resources would help equip a champion to be successful in their role?
  6. How can the success or impact of a champion be measured?

October chat transcript and analytics

The transcript of our October chat on librarians as teachers is now up at Symplur, as are the analytics. Thanks to @samanthaclare for leading the discussion, and to everyone who took part. Next month’s’ chat will take place at 8 pm on Tuesday 17 November. We have a very interesting and up-to-the minute topic lined up. We’re waiting for some detail to be ironed out before we announce it, here and, of course, on Twitter.

October #ukmedlibs chat: librarians as teachers

Teaching is an essential part of our job, whether it’s on a formal basis or a more informal one (see: http://interlibnet.org/2015/09/29/librarian-as-teacher-information-literacy-in-special-libraries-or-how-to-secretly-teach-people-things/) There was a fairly recent conference hosted by the West Midlands ARLG committee – Librarians as Teachers – and one of things that stood out for me was how can we make best use of our time so that our lessons ‘stick’.

In any case there is a wealth of literature regarding librarians as teachers, but what do you actually do, do you see yourself as teachers, and what can you offer to the newly qualified librarian who might be a bit nervous about teaching – whether it’s on a one to one basis, or standing up in front of a large group and hoping to look (and feel!) confident?

So, we have a few questions for you to discuss during our next #UKMedLibs chat on Tuesday 20th October at 8pm:

  1. Do you have a teaching qualification – is it necessary?
  2. What was your last teachable moment? Was it planned or spontaneous?
  3. How do you know whether they learned what you taught them?
  4. What is your best teaching tool?
  5. What would you recommend to a new librarian?
  6. Are we teaching or are we training?
  7. Online versus face to face?
  8. How do you deal with difficult/disruptive participants?

Questions for tonight’s #ukmedlibs chat

Here’s the numbered questions for tonight’s chat. It helps structure the discussion if you tag your contributions with the chat hastag #ukmedlibs and Qn, depdnding on which question you’re responding to.

  1. Which are the best conferences? Which do you get the most out of?
  2. What are the killer arguments to use to persuade your lovely manager to send you?
  3. Apart from your employer, who else could support your attendance?
  4. If you want to present, how do you get your abstract accepted?
  5. You’re there! What are your tips and tricks for getting the most out of a conference?
  6. Why attend non-library confererences?

We start at 8pm. See you there

Conferences: September chat, 8 pm, Tuesday 15 September

The Health Libraries Group has announced details of their 2016 conference, so this month we’re going to talk about conferences. Health library and knowledge workers can go to a broad range of conferences; there’s our own, HLG, of course, but also EAHIL and MLA. Then there’s other professional conferences, not specifically for health, such as CILIP’s conference, UKSG, IFLA and so on. And more and more of us are going to conferences clinicians take part in, sometimes to promote our services, sometimes as presenters. Conferences play a unique part in the exchange of ideas and can send you back to your workplace full of ideas to make the world better for your users and your colleagues.

We’ll use the collective wisdom of the chat to answer questions such as these:

  1. Which are the best conferences? Which do you get the most out of?
  2. What are the killer arguments to use to persuade your lovely manager to send you?
  3. Apart from your employer, who else could support your attendance?
  4. If you want to present, how do you get your abstract accepted?
  5. You’re there! What are your tips and tricks for getting the most out of a conference?
  6. Why attend non-library confererences?

Website for the #ukmedlibs Twitter chats