Questions for tonight’s #ukmedlibs chat

Here’s the numbered questions for tonight’s chat. It helps structure the discussion if you tag your contributions with the chat hastag #ukmedlibs and Qn, depdnding on which question you’re responding to.

  1. Which are the best conferences? Which do you get the most out of?
  2. What are the killer arguments to use to persuade your lovely manager to send you?
  3. Apart from your employer, who else could support your attendance?
  4. If you want to present, how do you get your abstract accepted?
  5. You’re there! What are your tips and tricks for getting the most out of a conference?
  6. Why attend non-library confererences?

We start at 8pm. See you there

Conferences: September chat, 8 pm, Tuesday 15 September

The Health Libraries Group has announced details of their 2016 conference, so this month we’re going to talk about conferences. Health library and knowledge workers can go to a broad range of conferences; there’s our own, HLG, of course, but also EAHIL and MLA. Then there’s other professional conferences, not specifically for health, such as CILIP’s conference, UKSG, IFLA and so on. And more and more of us are going to conferences clinicians take part in, sometimes to promote our services, sometimes as presenters. Conferences play a unique part in the exchange of ideas and can send you back to your workplace full of ideas to make the world better for your users and your colleagues.

We’ll use the collective wisdom of the chat to answer questions such as these:

  1. Which are the best conferences? Which do you get the most out of?
  2. What are the killer arguments to use to persuade your lovely manager to send you?
  3. Apart from your employer, who else could support your attendance?
  4. If you want to present, how do you get your abstract accepted?
  5. You’re there! What are your tips and tricks for getting the most out of a conference?
  6. Why attend non-library confererences?

Transcript of last night’s #ukmedlibs chat on public library-health library partnership

The transcript of last night’s  chat on public library-health library partnership is up at

Thanks to everyone who contributed, and to Holly Case for leading the discussion. if there’s a topic you’d like discussed at a future format, get in touch, by e-mail or on Twitter. And if you’d like to lead a session, get in touch. It’s an experience, as those who have already led one will tell you.

Next #ukmedlibs Twitter chat, Tuesday 18 August health and public libraries partnerships

Knowledge for healthcare: a development framework (KfH) clearly states the importance of working closely with our colleagues in public libraries. Many of us have already been doing this for a number of years, especially as so many public library services also work in health promotion, but what will this relationship look like going forward? How can we go about creating an effective and mutually beneficial partnership? Are there examples of work already in progress out there? Join us on Tuesday 18th August at 8pm for our next discussion on the partnership between health libraries and public libraries, led by Holly Case.

We’ll ask everyone to tweet a brief introduction and then we’ll structure the discussion around the following questions; they’re not set in stone, so please feel free to raise anything else you wish to discuss. We are hoping that our public libraries colleagues will also join in, it will be interesting to see the relationship from the other side.

Q1. Are you currently working with your local public library? If yes, then how and if not, what barriers are stopping you?

Q2. Do you think that KfH will help solidify the relationships between public libraries and NHS libraries?

Q3. KfH mentions the importance of partnerships in offering “coordinated information to patients and the public”. Do you think our public libraries colleagues will be able to support us in that?

Q4. In 2014 The Society of Chief Librarians and Reading Agency put forward the Public Libraries Universal Health Offer, how can we use our knowledge of the NHS and health information to support them?

Q5. Have you got any tips for joint working?

  • Project suggestions?
  • Any barriers? How did you overcome them?

Chats are archived on Symplur

That was July’s twitter chat, now for August’s

Thanks to everyone who participated in our Twitter journal club on Tuesday. If you missed it, or you want to relive some of the more exciting moments, Symplur host a transcript, as they do for every chat, with added analytics.

Our next chat will be at 8 pm on Tuesday 18 August, when Holly Case will lead a discussion on public library and NHS library partnerships. Holly is very well qualified for this, as she moved into health libraries recently, after working for Surrey County Council’s library service. It’s topical too, as Health Education England’s Knowledge for Healthcare: A Development Framework stresses the importance of partnerships to support public and patient information, while CILIP’s Public and Mobile Libraries Group is to hold its annual conference in October on a health and wellbeing theme.

Questions for tonight’s #ukmedlibs Twitter journal club

Tonight we’re going to try a journal club, and we’re discussing this paper:

Rethlefsen ML, Farrell AM, Osterhaus Trzasko LC, Brigham TJ. Librarian co-authors correlated with higher quality reported search strategies in general internal medicine systematic reviews. J Clin Epidemiol. 2015 Jun;68(6):617-26. doi: 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2014.11.025. Epub 2015 Feb 7

We’ll start with introductions. Please tweet something to tell us who and where you are. The session will be lead by Tom Roper, who’ll tweet as @ukmedlibs, and give a summary of the paper for those who haven’t been able to get hold of full text, or who didn’t have time to read it. If you want to see a presentation Tom gave on this paper to the Brighton and Sussex NHS Library and Knowledge Service’s Journal Club last week, it’s on SlideShare.

Then we’ll tackle the following questions. Please tag your contributions with the number of the question you’re responding to, e.g. Q1 as well as, of course, with the #ukmedlibs hashtag.

Q1. How valid is the study’s methodology?

Q2. How reliable are the study’s conclusions?

Q3. How applicable are the results to our practice?

Q4. The study is about Systematic Review (SR) searches. How applicable to searches of other types is the conclusion? How much of our search workload comprises searches to support SRs?

Q5 How can we persuade authors and editors to change their policies?

Q6 How can we contribute to further research on methods for the assessment of published search strategies?

As ever, a transcript of the chat will be made available after the event.

Website for the #ukmedlibs Twitter chats